Senior citizens

Is Boomer boom for real?

Your correspondent believes demographics is destiny.

An easy thing to believe in Florida. A place where population growth -- or its sudden reversal -- can explain almost everything we do. At least those things that are explainable. Not everything is, you know.

So when the U.S. Census Bureau released a compilation of Baby Boomer statistics the other week, he took notice. Boomers are people born during the population burst between 1946-1964.

Snowbirds swoop in on home deals

DUNEDIN - You can add real estate offices after restaurants, golf courses, condos and RV parks on the list of where you will find snowbirds, the perennial winter visitors from Michigan, Ontario and other parts north who began arriving in early November.

Despite the poor economy, and stronger efforts by Western states to recruit seasonal visitors affluent enough to afford two residences, more snowbirds are expected to gather in Florida this year than last, partly because of housing prices here.

Texas, the new Florida, lures seniors with sun, low cost living

After trying out Atlanta, Miami and Pasadena, Calif., Lilian Junco decided this was the place to retire. Being near her son was the first attraction, but soon she was drawn in by the same combination of features that has lured tens of thousands of others from out of state -- Gulf Coast living, plus super-low costs.

With some of the country's cheapest prices for housing, gas and food, no state income tax and one of the most resilient economies in the nation, Galveston and other parts of the Lone Star state are emerging as the new Florida.

'Graying' population will strain Florida

TALLAHASSEE - Since World War II, Florida has beckoned retirees looking to spend their golden years in the sun. The steady stream has made Florida's population the oldest in the nation.

Now, Florida is headed for an even grayer future in the Baby Boomer retirement era, state economists and demographers predict. The consequences: worker shortages and severe strains on public pensions and government services.

Study says 26% of Florida residents in 2030 will be 65 or older

More than one in four residents of Florida in 2030 will be 65 years or older, compared to 17% today, the University of Florida's Bureau of Economic and Business Research reports. The study, which was commissioned by the state legislature, says the boom in boomers in Florida will mean worker shortages and severe strains on public pensions and government services. It projects that Florida's current retiree population -- 3.3 million residents 65 or older -- will jump to 4.6 million in 2020 and 6.3 million in 2030.

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Aging boomers strain pension funds

TALLAHASSEE – Since World War II, Florida has beckoned retirees looking to spend their golden years in the sun. The steady stream has made Florida the oldest state in the nation. Now, Florida is headed for an even grayer future in the Baby Boomer retirement era, state economists and demographers predict. The consequences: worker shortages and severe strains on public pensions and government services.

Seniors in crisis

Four out of 10 households in Marion County are occupied by someone who is 65 or older.

That is perhaps no surprise in Florida which, according to recently released census statistics, ranks first in the nation for percentage of older households.

COA center is work in progress

The community center, which allows the St. Johns County Council on Aging to expand its services for the elderly, was slated to be completed by late November.

Expanded services for the elderly in St. Johns County could be coming at the right time. The county's population of adults 65 years and older is expected to reach 40,822 in 2010 and climb to 49,868 in 2015, according to the University of Florida's Bureau of Economic and Business Research.

COA center is work in progress - St. Augustine Record - July 4, 2009

Census: Manatee less white since 2000

MANATEE — Manatee County has become slightly younger, a little more masculine, more racially diverse and a lot more Hispanic so far this decade, according to Census estimates to be released today.

The county’s Hispanic and Asian populations have nearly doubled, its median age has fallen by a few months and males narrowed their numerical gap with females between 2000 and mid-2008, the figures show.

The Census’ July 1, 2008, statistical snapshot of Manatee largely mirrored Florida, which has steadily become more ethnically and racially diverse, demographers said.

Don't kill the snowbirds

Florida's most self-destructive annual sport - shooting at the snowbirds - opened last week. Did you bag your limit?

Once Easter passes, Florida's seasonal residents start flying north and northwest. They'll start coming back from October through Thanksgiving. Coincidentally, their migratory pattern tracks that of turkey vultures, for which year-rounders must mistake snowbirds, given their comments.

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