Natural disasters

Floridians’ Consumer Sentiment falls for third straight month

GAINESVILLE, Fla. — Consumer Sentiment among Floridians dropped for a third consecutive month — falling to 68 in April — as the economy struggles because of domestic budget woes, soaring gas prices and international unrest, according to a new University of Florida survey.

Florida’s Consumer Sentiment wanes as events unravel overseas

GAINESVILLE, Fla. — Consumer Sentiment among Floridians dropped four points in March to 72 as many economic indicators for Florida continue to show signs of weakness, according to a new University of Florida survey.

Three of the index components decreased as natural disasters and political turmoil overseas offset the index’s seven-point spike in January.

Florida’s population loss is Alabama’s gain

Lillian Vickers doesn’t have to think very long about why she left Florida.

“Three hurricanes in 15 months. It got to be too much,” said Vickers, who relocated to Dothan from Okeechobee, Fla., in October 2006.

How she and her husband — and the family dog — came here, of all places, had to do with proximity. Vickers has family in Tallahassee and a niece in Enterprise, and because her husband is retired military, they liked being close to Fort Rucker.

Fleeing the storm(s): An examination of evacuation behavior during Florida’s 2004 hurricane season

The 2004 hurricane season was the worst in Florida’s history, with four hurricanes causing at least 47 deaths and some $45 billion in damages. In order to collect information on the demographic impact of those hurricanes, we surveyed households throughout the state and in the local areas sustaining the greatest damage. We estimate that one-quarter of Florida’s population evacuated prior to at least one hurricane; in some areas, well over half the residents evacuated at least once and many evacuated several times.

Publication Date: 
02/01/2009
Author(s): 
Smith, Stanley K.; McCarty, Chris
Pages: 
46 pages

The Demographic Impact of The 2004 Hurricane Season In Florida

By most measures, the 2004 hurricane season was the worst in Florida’s history. Four hurricanes blasted through the state between August 13 and September 25, with Charley making landfall on the southwest coast near Punta Gorda, Frances on the southeast coast near Stuart, Ivan in the panhandle near Pensacola, and Jeanne nearly retracing the route followed by Frances. This was the first time in recorded history that four hurricanes had struck Florida in a single year. Most parts of the state were hit by at least one of the hurricanes and some were hit by two or even three.

Publication Date: 
07/01/2005
Author(s): 
Smith, Stanley K.; McCarty, Christopher
Pages: 
9 pages

Florida’s 2004 Hurricane Season: Local Effects

Florida was struck by four devastating hurricanes in 2004. In a previous issue of Florida Focus, we presented the results of a survey designed to assess the impact of those hurricanes at the state level. Those results provided a useful statewide overview, but provided no information on the impact of the hurricanes on local areas in Florida. Since some of the most populous parts of the state were largely unaffected by the hurricanes, state-level results understate the impact of the hurricanes on many local areas.

Publication Date: 
10/01/2005
Author(s): 
McCarty, Christopher; Smith, Stanley K.
Pages: 
13 pages

Demographic effects of natural disasters: A case study of Hurricane Andrew

Many studies have considered the economic, social, and psychological effects of hurricanes, earthquakes, floods, tornadoes, and other natural disasters, but few have considered their demographic effects. In this paper we describe and evaluate a method for measuring the effects on Hurricane Andrew on the housing stock and population distribution in Dade County, Florida

Publication Date: 
05/01/1996
Author(s): 
Smith, Stanley K.; McCarty, Christopher
Pages: 
12 pages

Demography of disaster: Population estimates after Hurricane Andrew

Hurricane Andrew blasted through the southern tip of Florida in August 1992, damaging or destroying tens of thousands of homes and forcing hundreds of thousands of persons to move at least temporarily to different places of residence. The hurricane not only disrupted the lives of many Floridians, but destroyed the statistical basis for producing local population estimates in South Florida as well. These estimates are used for many types of decision-making, from the distribution of state revenue-sharing dollars to choosing sites for fast-food restuarants.

Publication Date: 
12/01/1996
Author(s): 
Smith, Stanley K.
Pages: 
19 pages

Florida’s 2004 Hurricane Season: Demographic Response and Recovery

In this study, we describe an approach that can be used to estimate the demographic impact of hurricanes and other natural disasters, provide a detailed assessment of the 2004 hurricane season in Florida, compare the 2004 hurricanes with Hurricanes Andrew (1992) and Katrina (2005), and draw several conclusions regarding the likely impact of hurricanes and other natural disasters on future population growth.

Publication Date: 
11/02/2006
Author(s): 
McCarty, Christopher; Smith, Stanley K.
Pages: 
40 pages

Fleeing the Storm(s): Evacuations During Florida’s 2004 Hurricane Season

The 2004 hurricane season was the worst in Florida’s history, with four hurricanes causing at least 47 deaths and some $45 billion in damages. In order to collect information on the demographic impact of those hurricanes, we surveyed households throughout the state and in the local areas sustaining the greatest damage. Using these data, we estimated that one-quarter of Florida’s population evacuated prior to at least one of the hurricanes; in some areas, well over half the residents evacuated at least once and many evacuated several times.

Publication Date: 
03/29/2007
Author(s): 
Smith, Stanley K.; McCarty, Chris
Pages: 
47 pages
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