BEBR

RESEARCH REPORTS

We conduct research for a variety of local and state government agencies as well as private industry, often collaborating with other research centers. The studies include cost-benefit analysis, economic impact, education, housing, employment projections, property taxes, and many other areas.

The Net Impact Of Retirees On Florida’s State And Local Budgets

Publication Type: Fiscal Impact
Pages: 14
Authors: Denslow, David; Schaub, Ray
Division: Economic Analysis

PDF: https://www.bebr.ufl.edu/sites/default/files/Research%20Reports/retiree_net_impact_on_floridas_budgets_final_7-8-13.pdf

Research Report, Retirees, Senior citizens, Taxable sales, Taxes, Florida data

Read More

Polk County Healthcare Study: An Economic Analysis Of Polk County’s Indigent Health Care Tax And Safety Net Program

Polk County, Florida’s Indigent Health Care program guarantees the provision of quality health care to the indigent and medically poor residents of the county. For the past 11 years, a one-half cent sales surtax approved by voters in Polk County in 2004 has provided funding for medical and dental services to hundreds of thousands of Polk’s most vulnerable people.

Read More

A Micro-Location Model Of Public Investment In Pedestrian Safety Capital

Publication Type: Benefit-Cost, Public Policy, Transportation
Pages: 23
Authors: Lenze, David G.
Division: Not Available
This paper presents a micro-location model of public investment in pedestrian safety capital. A special case of the model predicts that economies of scale in safety capital can offset the effect of rising population density on the pedestrian fatality rate. Using county level data we confirm this prediction empirically and measure the elasticity of the fatality rate with respect to civil time of sunrise and sunset, sales at bars, highway lane miles, income, climate, and tourism. Pedestrian fatalities on interstate highways are shown to differ from those elsewhere. Other accidents are shown to be the best pedestrian exposure measure on interstates.

PDF: https://www.bebr.ufl.edu/sites/default/files/Research%20Reports/micro_location_model_0.pdf

Subject Index:
Deaths, Pedestrian safety, Policy Studies, Public policy, Transportation

Analysis Of A Florida Beverage Container Deposit Refund System

Publication Type: Benefit-Cost, Economic Impact, Fiscal Impact, Program Evaluation, Industrial and Occupational Structure, Public Policy, Revenue Forecasting, Taxation
Pages: 20
Authors: Dewey, James F; Denslow, David; Chavez, Belen; Romero, Henrique; Holt, Lynne
Division: Economic Analysis
Summary: This report presents the results of an independent assessment of a potential beverage container deposit refund system for Florida, conducted by the Economic Analysis Program of the Bureau of Economic and Business Research at the University of Florida, and funded by Owens Illinois, Inc. While the analysis represents the best professional judgment of the project team, it does not necessarily represent the views of either Owens Illinois Inc. or the University of Florida.

Analysis of a Florida Beverage Container Deposit Refund System

Jim Dewey, Dave Denslow, Belen Chavez, Henrique Romero, Lynne Holt

Overview: Instituting a beverage container deposit refund system (BCDRS) in the state of Florida represents a sound policy option capable of reducing waste and litter, encouraging recycling, offsetting taxes, orpreserving the jobs of state or local workers in the short term. Such a policy would also complement long-term efforts to preserve the natural environment crucial to the state’s economic well-being, and to serveas a modest step toward reducing the costs oftransitioning to a world with higher resourceprices.

Introduction:On an average day Floridians consume some 36 million sodas and other container beverages. Though they soon recycle about 6 million of the containers, most of the other million wind up as landfill, and some wind up as litter. As Florida’s urban areas grow, convenient landfill sites become harder to find, and litter is a particular concern in a state that attracts retirees and tourists because of its natural beauty and a climate that encourages enjoying the outdoors.

One way to slow landfill growth and reduce litter would be to mandate recycling, requiring people to bring their empty containers to collection sites. Such a mandate, however, would be heavy handed and difficult to enforce. Better would be to reward people for recycling, using a mechanism that mimics market incentives—collect a deposit at the time of sale and return it when the empty container is brought to a collection site. Such a policy, known as a beverage container deposit refund system, has been adopted by ten states with a third of the nation’s population.

Many people may favor a BCDRS because it strikes them as fair. Those who fill our landfills with durable containers or litter instead of recycling should pay the cost they impose on others. Though we are sympathetic to concerns about fairness, we restrict our analysis to the efficiency of a BCDRS, leading us to consider the role of markets in waste disposal and recycling.

While markets normally do a good job of allocating resources, people may overproduce litter and waste if all associated costs are not borne by those creating the litter or waste. Similarly, people may recycle too little if some of the benefits of recycling accrue to someone besides those bearing the costs of recycling. A BCDRS creates a financial incentive to discourage litter and waste and encourage recycling, thus relying on market mechanisms to overcome potential inefficiencies in waste disposal and recycling outcomes.

In addition, unredeemed deposit revenue (UDR) typically accrues or escheats to the state. UDR, net of any handling fees paid to offset the cost of processing returned containers and other program costs, can be used to finance other programs or to offset taxes. Because taxes distort decisions and create administrative and enforcement costs, it costs society more than a dollar to raise a dollar of tax revenue. Net UDR can reduce this excess burden of taxation.

Summary of Main Findings: With an optimized BCDRS, the incremental benefit of a returned beverage container, net of processing costs, is just under 2.5¢. A deposit of 2.5¢ per container would result in net benefits to Floridians of about $141 million per year (the exact amount depends on future resource prices) and net UDR of about $70million per year. Rounding the deposit up to3¢ reduces net benefits to about $139 million and increases net UDR to about $83 million.

A 5¢ per container deposit would result in lower net benefits because individuals would make returns that cost up to 5¢ but have benefits of only about 2.5¢. Net UDR would be about the same as with a 3¢ deposit. Net UDR falls as the deposit increases beyond about 4¢ per container as higher deposits result in higher redemption rates and therefore higher payouts of refunds and handling fees.

Analytical Services Relating To Property Taxation – PART 2: Revenue Component

Publication Type: Fiscal Impact, Regional Modeling, Housing, Property Taxes, Public Policy, Revenue Forecasting, Taxation
Pages: 264
Authors: Archer, Wayne R.; Denslow, David A.; Dewey, James F.; Gatzlaff, Dean H.; Johns, Tracy L.; Macpherson, David A.; Norrbin, Stefan C.; Schlagenhauf, Donald E.; Scicchitano, Michael J.; Sirmans, G. Stacy; Stroh, Robert C.; Williamson, Anne R.
Division: Economic Analysis
The interaction between the Save Our Homes assessment limit and Florida’s housing boom created a property tax system riddled with inequities and inefficiencies. The inequities are obvious, and the newspapers are filled with examples: neighbors with similar houses but one paying twice the property tax of the other. A more subtle inequity is that Save Our Homes favors homesteaders over renters, who on average are less affluent. The inefficiencies are both economic and political.

PDF: https://www.bebr.ufl.edu/sites/default/files/Research%20Reports/revenue_report_0.pdf

Subject Index:
Property taxes, Public policy, Save Our Homes

Annual IRS In- And Out-Migration Data For MSAs, 1985-86 To 2007-08

Publication Type: Regional Modeling, Industrial and Occupational Structure, Labor Force and Labor Markets
Pages: 1
Authors: Denslow, David
Division: Economic Analysis
The Internal Revenue Service tracks movements of tax filers annually from county to county. If a filer listed their address as Orange County, CA in 2007, and Maricopa County, AZ in 2008, then that person is counted as a 2007-08 migrant from Orange County to Maricopa County. In the downloadable file, we have reorganized some of the IRS data into tables containing in-migration, out-migration, and net migration by MSA from 1992-93 to 2007-08. To do this we first netted out intra-MSA migration. The Northport-Bradenton-Sarasota MSA in Florida, for example, contains two counties, Manatee and Sarasota. We netted out the migration between Manatee and Sarasota. For the Tampa-St. Petersburg-Clearwater MSA, which has four counties, we netted out all the intra-MSA flows. Second, we checked for outliers. Roughly speaking, we checked all outliers larger than two standard deviations. When we found them, we compared out-migration from the MSA to in-migration to all other counties from that MSA. That comparison is limited because the IRS censors any county-to-county data for which there are fewer then ten migrants, and sometimes on other criteria. If that comparison made it clear that the number was wrong, we estimated it by looking at the median ratio of the numbers for in-migration over the years and using that to estimate a replacement for the erroneous number. You can tell when that was done by a number’s not being an integer. (We are exploring improved interpolation methods.) Third, we organized the data by MSA and by year, so that when you find an MSA, the numbers for all 16 years are conveniently available. Obviously these data have imperfections, the most important being that they are only tax filers. The proportion of migrants who file tax forms probably changes over time and varies across places. Also, for many analyses you would not want to use our interpolations. We have future plans to include individual origin and destination MSAs, and are considering including data about building permits and house prices. Please feel free to use this data set, prepared by Katherine Thomason and Henrique Romero, in any way you wish, with the caution that it is a beta version. Please direct inquiries and/or data suggestions to Henrique Romero, Assistant Research Economist, Bureau of Economic and Business Research, University of Florida, henriquer@bebr.ufl.edu.

PDF: https://www.bebr.ufl.edu/sites/default/files/Research%20Reports/migration_documentation.pdf
https://www.bebr.ufl.edu/sites/default/files/Research%20Reports/migration_documentation_85-92.pdf

Subject Index:
Migration, MSA data

Baby Boom Retirees – 2012 Florida Regional Economic Symposium

Publication Type: Not Available
Pages: 21
Authors: Dewey, James F; Denslow, David
Division: Economic Analysis
By 2030, approximately 26% of Floridians will be age 65 or older, up from 17% in 2010. In standard regional general equilibrium models, retirees and the local workers who produce goods and services for them drive up housing prices and thus crowd out workers that produce for export beyond the local area. Job skill in Florida’s metropolitan statistical areas (MSAs) in 2004 (before the peak of the housing bubble and ensuing crash) was 4 percentage points below the na-tional average, using national average pay as a measure of occupational skill. Half of the short-fall is attributable to Florida’s specialization in serving retirees and another third is attributable to lower shares of college graduates, which is in turn related to retiree specialization. As an exam-ple of less direct mechanisms through which retirees may make an area less suited to high-skill jobs, the elasticity of airline departures with respect to the retiree share of the local population is estimated to be –4.2. By 2030, approximately 40% of voters in Florida will be age 65 or older, magnifying their impact on policies affecting job skill. The population of retirees will be spatial-ly concentrated, with about one third of Floridians living in counties where 30% or more of resi-dents are age 65 or older. Absent urgent and aggressive policy intervention, Florida’s workers that retire over the next 20 years are likely to be replaced by less educated and less skilled work-ers less suited to the knowledge economy, and the gap between Florida’s average job skill and the national average is likely to widen substantially.

PDF: https://www.bebr.ufl.edu/sites/default/files/Research%20Reports/baby_boom_retirees_-_2012_florida_regional_economic_symposium.pdf

Subject Index:
Not Available

Consumer Protection In The Digital Age

Publication Type: Public Policy
Pages: 18
Authors: Holt, Lynne; McMacManus, Susan A.
Division: Not Available
March 2-8 is National Consumer Protection Week and to underscore the importance of and need for consumer protection, researchers Dr. Lynne Holt, University of Florida, and Dr. Susan MacManus, University of South Florida, jointly review several types of fraudulent practices that often result in consumer complaints in Florida: identity theft; health insurance fraud; fraud related to home repair, mortgages, and home insurance; and auto repair fraud and price gouging. In “Consumer Protection in the Digital Age,” Holt and MacManus outline government measures to reduce fraudulent practices and analyze data from recent BEBR surveys to explain Floridians’ attitudes toward and concerns about consumer fraud and the manner in which it is perpetrated.

PDF: https://www.bebr.ufl.edu/sites/default/files/Research%20Reports/floridafocus4_2_2008_0.pdf

Subject Index:
Public Policy

Consumers’ Attitude Toward Energy Conservation And Energy Efficiency: The Role Of Electric Rates

Publication Type: Industrial and Occupational Structure, Public Policy
Pages: 7
Authors: Holt, Lynne; Larson, Carol Jacobson
Division: Economic Analysis
Federal, state, and utility measures provide incentives for people to use electricity more efficiently or consume less energy. However, the effectiveness of such incentives depends on consumers’ behavior. Through analysis of survey data, Dr. Lynne Holt and Ms. Carol Jacobson Larson explain consumers’ attitudes toward energy conservation and energy efficiency as a means of meeting Florida’s electricity needs. Of particular interest is the use of electric rates in affecting consumer behavior.

PDF: https://www.bebr.ufl.edu/sites/default/files/Research%20Reports/floridafocus4_4_2008_0.pdf

Subject Index:
Energy

Doing Business In Florida: Florida Statistical Data Resources

Publication Type: Not Available
Pages: 8
Authors: Floyd, Susan S.
Division: Not Available
With a population of over 17 million residents, Florida is the fourth most populous and the third fastest growing state in the nation. It garners national and international interest in demographic, economic, and social statistics from people interested in moving to or visiting the state, starting businesses, financing business ventures, or planning for the state’s growth. This paper explores various resources for obtaining data about Florida.

PDF: https://www.bebr.ufl.edu/sites/default/files/Research%20Reports/floridafocus1_1_2005_0_0.pdf

Subject Index:
Not Available

Economic Aspects Of Potential Legal Challenges To Save Our Homes Portability Proposals

Publication Type: Fiscal Impact, Housing, Property Taxes, Public Policy
Pages: 18
Authors: Holt, Lynne
Division: Not Available
Several proposals for major changes in Florida’s state and local tax systems are now under discussion. The intense interest in taxes, and especially property taxes, arises from the interaction of Save Our Homes (SOH) and the recent housing boom.

PDF: https://www.bebr.ufl.edu/sites/default/files/Research%20Reports/floridafocus3_1_2007_0.pdf

Subject Index:
Property taxes, Public policy, Save Our Homes, Taxes

Economic Implications Of Florida’s Proposed Property Tax Amendment

Publication Type: Fiscal Impact, Regional Modeling, Housing, Property Taxes, Public Policy, Taxation
Pages: 10
Authors: Dewey, James F.; Denslow, David; Holt, Lynne; Lotfinia, Babak
Division: Economic Analysis
On January 29 of this year, Floridians will vote on a proposed constitutional amendment to reform the state’s property tax system. This proposal arose in response to widespread and growing dissatisfaction with the state’s current system of property taxation. Residents’ complaints about the tax system may be that total taxes are too high, that the distribution of taxes is inequitable, that high taxes on business make Florida uncompetitive, or that the current system “locks” owners in their present homestead properties. In “Economic Implications of Florida’s Proposed Property Tax Amendment,” the Economic Analysis Program at the University of Florida’s Bureau of Economic and Business Research takes a look at the effects of the proposed reform on each of these complaints. They find that the proposed reform will generally have no impact on the first, will seriously exacerbate the second and third, and improve only the fourth

PDF: https://www.bebr.ufl.edu/sites/default/files/Research%20Reports/floridafocus4_1_2008_1.pdf

Subject Index:
Economy, Housing, Property taxes, Public policy

Florida And Orlando: Choosing The Future After The Recession

Publication Date:

Tuesday, May 24, 2011

The Reubin O’D Askew Institute on Politics and Society has partnered with the Bureau of Economic and Business Research to develop a series of Florida Focus papers that highlight how various regions in Florida are positioning themselves to move forward after the Great Recession. This paper – the second in the series – is a background essay written for participants in a meeting titled “Orlando:  Choosing Our Future after the Great Recession,” that was co‐sponsored by the Askew Institute and the City of Orlando on May 18, 2011.

 

 

Florida and Orlando: Choosing the Future after the Recession

Dr. Lynne Holt and David Colburn

 

Overview: Florida and Orlando’s diverse populations present unique challenges, as well as opportunities, in a post-“Great Recession” era. Investments in key growth sectors and supporting infrastructure are essential to the region’s economic future, and the economic expansion resulting from such investments will strengthen the foundation of both the region and the state as they emerge from the recession.

Introduction: From 1970 to 2010, the populations of both Florida and Orlando expanded dramatically and became more diverse.  Joining the wave of retirees and workers seeking better job prospects were immigrants from throughout Latin America. Over 2 out of 5 Florida residents are classified as having a race other than “white, non-Hispanic.” In Orlando, the ratio is even higher than that of the state, with almost 3 in 5 residents classified as such. Florida’s African American population expanded in the 1990s and 2000s, bolstered by the migration and immigration of African Americans, Jamaicans and Haitians. In contrast, Orlando’s remained fairly stable. Constituting 17% of the population, Florida’s seniors have exercised extraordinary political influence that extends well beyond their proportion of the population. They tend to vote more than other age cohorts. Orlando’s senior population is smaller and younger relative to the state average.   In the past, forging consensus among such a diverse population was not particularly daunting because economic growth provided widespread opportunity.  However, when the economy began to decline, the lack of understanding Floridians had for their state and one another became an enormous obstacle in responding to the Great Recession.

   By spring 2008, Florida’s economy had begun to seize up. Still, Floridians, who only knew growth, believed the downturn would not last long or be very deep. By 2009, that optimism had been dispelled and the migration of the retirement population slowed to a crawl.  Florida found itself buried in a mountain of debt, and jobs fell to a 10-year low for many of the state’s major cities.  The number of Florida’s leisure and recreation-related jobs fell in 2008 and 2009 as a result of the national decline in disposable income, but increased in 2010. Orlando has a greater reliance on tourism employment than the state as a whole. The number of tourists visiting Orlando decreased about 4.7% from 2008 to 2009. Yet, despite the dip, tourism in Orlando remained one of the more stable sources of revenue for the city and state during the recession. Although Florida’s and Orlando’s long-term economic prospects bode well, four lingering threats to recovery remain: high unemployment, a languishing housing market, a projected downturn in government employment, and creating jobs of the future.

Unemployment: Florida’s March 2011 unemployment rate (11.1%) was much higher than the 8.8% rate for the nation. The rate in Orlando (10.4%) was lower than in the state as a whole and has continued to decline, but is unlikely to return to the 4% rate of 2005 and 2006.

Housing Market: Another major drag on the state’s economic growth is the high percentage of foreclosures and unsold housing stock. Florida has the dubious distinction of leading all states with a foreclosure rate of 13.7% and with 23.5% of loans in either foreclosure or delinquency at the end of February 2011. Foreclosures likewise dampened Orlando’s economic growth. All indicators suggest that the housing crisis will persist for several years.

Government Jobs:  In 2010, the share of government employment…was 15.5% in the state and 11.6% in the Orlando metro area.  Federal and state budget cuts are likely to increase unemployment in this sector in the near term and drive down their spending as a consequence.

Jobs of the Future: Wells Fargo Securities recently identified several growth sectors that would have a high share of employment in the future: finance and insurance, professional and technical services, accommodation and food service, and health care and social assistance.

Florida And Orlando: Choosing The Future After The Recession

Publication Type: Regional Modeling, Development, Public Policy
Pages: 11
Authors: Holt, Lynne; Colburn, David
Division: Not Available
The Reubin O’D Askew Institute on Politics and Society has partnered with the Bureau of Economic and Business Research to develop a series of Florida Focus papers that highlight how various regions in Florida are positioning themselves to move forward after the Great Recession. This paper – the second in the series – is a background essay written for participants in a meeting titled “Orlando: Choosing Our Future after the Great Recession,” that was co‐sponsored by the Askew Institute and the City of Orlando on May 18, 2011.

PDF: https://www.bebr.ufl.edu/sites/default/files/Research%20Reports/fl_focus7_2_2011.pdf

Subject Index:
Community development, Economy, Public policy, Recession, City data, Florida data

Florida County Retail Price And Wage Indices 2004

Publication Type: Regional Modeling, Cost of Living, Housing, Industrial and Occupational Structure, Labor Force and Labor Markets, Wages and Compensation
Pages: 10
Authors: Bureau of Economic and Business Research
Division: Not Available
This report presents and discusses the 2004 Florida County Retail Price Index, the FCRPI, and the 2004 Florida County Wage Index, the FCWI, produced by the Bureau of Economic and Business Research, BEBR, at the University of Florida.

PDF: https://www.bebr.ufl.edu/sites/default/files/Research%20Reports/fpli_sp_2004_0_0.pdf

Subject Index:
Cost of living, Earnings, Economy, Education, Employment, Florida County Retail Price and Wage Indices, Prices, Publications, Wages, County data, Florida data

Florida County Retail Price And Wage Indices 2005

Publication Type: Regional Modeling, Cost of Living, Housing, Industrial and Occupational Structure, Labor Force and Labor Markets, Wages and Compensation
Pages: 7
Authors: Dewey, James F.; Denslow, David; Lotfinia, Babak T.
Division: Economic Analysis
This report presents and discusses the 2005 editions of the Florida County Retail Price Index (FCRPI) and the Florida County Wage Index (FCWI), produced by the Bureau of Economic and Business Research (BEBR) at the University of Florida.

PDF: https://www.bebr.ufl.edu/sites/default/files/Research%20Reports/fcrpi_2005.pdf

Subject Index:
Cost of living, Earnings, Economy, Education, Employment, Florida County Retail Price and Wage Indices, Prices, Publications, Wages, County data, Florida data

Florida County Retail Price And Wage Indices 2006

Publication Type: Regional Modeling, Cost of Living, Housing, Industrial and Occupational Structure, Labor Force and Labor Markets, Wages and Compensation
Pages: 9
Authors: Bureau of Economic and Business Research
Division: Economic Analysis
This report presents and discusses the 2006 editions of the Florida County Retail Price Index (FCRPI) and the Florida County Wage Index (FCWI), produced by the Bureau of Economic and Business Research (BEBR) at the University of Florida. In the narrowest sense, the FCRPI measures the relative expenditure required to purchase the same basket of goods and services purchased by the average Floridian in each of Florida’s counties at a particular point in time, in this case August 2006.

PDF: https://www.bebr.ufl.edu/sites/default/files/Research%20Reports/fcrpi_2006_0.pdf

Subject Index:
Cost of living Earnings, Economy, Education, Employment, Florida County Retail Price and Wage Indices, Prices, Publications, Wages, County data, Florida data

Florida County Retail Price And Wage Indices 2007

Publication Type: Regional Modeling, Cost of Living, Housing, Industrial and Occupational Structure, Labor Force and Labor Markets, Wages and Compensation
Pages: 8
Authors: Bureau of Economic and Business Research
Division: Not Available
This report presents and discusses the 2007 editions of the Florida County Retail Price Index (FCRPI) and the Florida County Wage Index (FCWI), produced by the Bureau of Economic and Business Research (BEBR) at the University of Florida.

PDF: https://www.bebr.ufl.edu/sites/default/files/Research%20Reports/fcrpi_2007_0.pdf

Subject Index:
Cost of living, Earnings, Economy, Education, Employment, Florida County Retail Price and Wage Indices, Prices, Publications, Wages, County data, Florida data

Florida Price Level Index 2002

Publication Type: Regional Modeling, Cost of Living, Housing, Industrial and Occupational Structure, Labor Force and Labor Markets, Wages and Compensation
Pages: 10
Authors: Bureau of Economic and Business Research
Division: Not Available
Established by the Legislature as the basis for the District Cost Differential (DCD) in the Florida Education Finance Program, the Florida Price Level Index (FPLI) is used to represent the costs of hiring equally qualified personnel across school districts.

PDF: https://www.bebr.ufl.edu/sites/default/files/Research%20Reports/fpli_2002.pdf

Subject Index:
Economy, Education, Florida Price Level Index (FPLI), Prices, Publications, County data, Florida data

Florida Price Level Index 2003

Publication Type: Regional Modeling, Cost of Living, Housing, Industrial and Occupational Structure, Labor Force and Labor Markets, Wages and Compensation
Pages: 12
Authors: Bureau of Economic and Business Research
Division: Not Available
Established by the Legislature as the basis for the District Cost Differential (DCD) in the Florida Education Finance Program, the Florida Price Level Index (FPLI) is used to represent the costs of hiring equally qualified personnel across school districts.

PDF: https://www.bebr.ufl.edu/sites/default/files/Research%20Reports/fpli_2003.pdf

Subject Index:
Cost of living, Economy, Education, Florida Price Level Index (FPLI), Prices, Publications, County data, Florida data

Florida Price Level Index 2004

Publication Type: Regional Modeling, Cost of Living, Housing, Industrial and Occupational Structure, Labor Force and Labor Markets, Wages and Compensation
Pages: 7
Authors: Bureau of Economic and Business Research
Division: Not Available
The Florida Price Level Index (FPLI) was established by the Legislature as the basis for the District Cost Differential (DCD) in the Florida Education Finance Program (FEFP). In this role, the FPLI is used to represent the costs of hiring equally qualified personnel across school districts.

PDF: https://www.bebr.ufl.edu/sites/default/files/Research%20Reports/fpli_sp_2004_0.pdf

Subject Index:
Cost of living, Economy, Education, Florida Price Level Index (FPLI), Prices, Publications, County data, Florida data

Florida Price Level Index 2005

Publication Type: Regional Modeling, Cost of Living, Housing, Industrial and Occupational Structure, Labor Force and Labor Markets, Wages and Compensation
Pages: 5
Authors: Bureau of Economic and Business Research
Division: Not Available
The Florida Price Level Index (FPLI) was established by the Legislature as the basis for the District Cost Differential (DCD) in the Florida Education Finance Program. In this role, the FPLI is used to represent the costs of hiring equally qualified personnel across school districts. Since 1995, and at the request of the Legislature, the Bureau of Economic and Business Research (BEBR) at the University of Florida has performed an ongoing review of the methodology of the FPLI and has made appropriate recommendations to improve it.

PDF: https://www.bebr.ufl.edu/sites/default/files/Research%20Reports/fpli_sp_2005_0.pdf

Subject Index:
Cost of living, Economy, Education, Florida Price Level Index (FPLI), Prices, Publications, County data, Florida data

Florida Price Level Index 2006

Publication Type: Regional Modeling, Cost of Living, Housing, Industrial and Occupational Structure, Labor Force and Labor Markets, Wages and Compensation
Pages: 5
Authors: Bureau of Economic and Business Research
Division: Economic Analysis
The Florida Price Level Index (FPLI) was established by the Legislature as the basis for the District Cost Differential (DCD) in the Florida Education Finance Program. In this role, the FPLI is used to represent the costs of hiring equally qualified personnel across school districts.

PDF: https://www.bebr.ufl.edu/sites/default/files/Research%20Reports/fpli_sp_2006_0_0.pdf

Subject Index:
Cost of living,Economy,Education,Florida Price Level Index (FPLI),Prices,Publications,Research,County data,Florida data

Florida Price Level Index 2007

Publication Type: Regional Modeling,Cost of Living,Housing,Industrial and Occupational Structure,Labor Force and Labor Markets,Wages and Compensation
Pages: 4
Authors: Bureau of Economic and Business Research
Division: Economic Analysis
The Florida Price Level Index (FPLI), established by the Legislature as the basis for the District Cost Differential (DCD) in the Florida Education Finance Program, is used to represent the costs of hiring equally qualified personnel across school districts.

This brief includes a county FPLI comparison table of past years and a review of the FPLI methodology.

PDF: https://www.bebr.ufl.edu/sites/default/files/Research%20Reports/fpli_sp_2007_final.pdf

Subject Index:
Cost of living,Economy,Education,Florida Price Level Index (FPLI),Prices,Publications,Research,County data,Florida data

Florida Price Level Index 2008

Publication Type: Regional Modeling, Cost of Living, Housing, Industrial and Occupational Structure, Labor Force and Labor Markets, Wages and Compensation
Pages: 4
Authors: Dewey, James; Denslow, David; Lotfinia, Babak
Division: Economic Analysis
The Florida Price Level Index (FPLI), established by the Legislature as the basis for the District Cost Differential (DCD) in the Florida Education Finance Program, is used to represent the costs of hiring equally qualified personnel across school districts.

This brief includes a county FPLI comparison table of past years and a review of the FPLI methodology.

PDF: https://www.bebr.ufl.edu/sites/default/files/Research%20Reports/fpli_sp_2008.pdf

Subject Index:
Cost of living, Economy, Education, Florida Price Level Index (FPLI), Prices, Publications, Research, County data, Florida data

Florida Price Level Index 2009

Publication Type: Regional Modeling, Cost of Living, Housing, Industrial and Occupational Structure, Labor Force and Labor Markets, Wages and Compensation
Pages: 4
Authors: Dewey, James; Denslow, David; Irwin, Eve
Division: Economic Analysis
The Florida Price Level Index (FPLI), established by the Legislature as the basis for the District Cost Differential (DCD) in the Florida Education Finance Program, is used to represent the costs of hiring equally qualified personnel across school districts.

This brief includes a county FPLI comparison table of past years and a review of the FPLI methodology.

PDF: https://www.bebr.ufl.edu/sites/default/files/Research%20Reports/fpli_sp_2009_final.pdf

Subject Index:
Cost of living, Economy, Education, Florida Price Level Index (FPLI), Prices, Publications, County data, Florida data

Florida Price Level Index 2010

Publication Type: Regional Modeling, Cost of Living, Housing, Industrial and Occupational Structure, Labor Force and Labor Markets, Wages and Compensation
Pages: 4
Authors: Dewey, James F; Denslow, David, Irwin, Eve
Division: Economic Analysis
The Florida Price Level Index (FPLI), established by the Legislature as the basis for the District Cost Differential (DCD) in the Florida Education Finance Program, is used to represent the costs of hiring equally qualified personnel across school districts.

This brief includes a county FPLI comparison table of past years and a review of the FPLI methodology.

2010 Florida Price Level Index

James F. Dewey, David A. Denslow, Eve Irwin, Susan Floyd, Phoebe Wilson

Overview: The Florida Price Level Index (FPLI) was established by the Legislature as the basis for the District Cost Differential (DCD) in the Florida Education Finance Program. In this role, the FPLI is used to represent the costs of hiring equally qualified personnel across school districts. Since 1995, and at the request of the Legislature, the Bureau of Economic and Business Research (BEBR) at the University of Florida has performed an ongoing review of the methodology of the FPLI and has made appropriate recommendations to improve it. Since 2000, BEBR has also been responsible for calculating the FPLI. To denote its intended use as an adjustment factor for school personnel costs, the index presented in this report is referred to as the FPLI for School Personnel, or FPLI_SP. Note that this is a cross-sectional measure that compares the relative wage levels among Florida’s 67 counties and is not designed to measure inflation from one year to the next.

Results: The table on this page presents the index for 2010, which is constructed so that the population-weighted average is 100. The median Floridian, ranked by county FPLI_SP, lives in Brevard County, with an index value of 101.02. That is, less than half of the state’s residents live in counties with index values that are greater than 101.02, less than half in counties with index values that are less than 101.02, and the rest live in Brevard County. The 9 counties with index values over 101.02 together account for 48 percent of the state’s population and the 57 counties with index values below 101.02 together account for 49 percent of the state’s population. Index values tend to be highest in the southern portion of the state, while 42 of the 57 counties with index values below the median are north of Hillsborough County. When population in and around urban areas reaches the high levels seen in south Florida, workers encounter high house prices, long commutes, or both, for which they must be compensated in the form of higher wages. Of course, factors other than housing prices affect wages in a market economy, so relative wages do not track relative housing prices exactly.

Summary: This report presented the 2010 FPLI_SP and the methodology used in its calculation. The index uses extensive data on wages, occupational location, and the prices of goods and services to estimate the relative wage level needed to maintain a given standard of living for occupations comparable to school personnel across Florida’s counties. Although many things affect counties’ FPLI_SP position, counties that are urban tend to have higher values.

PDF: https://www.bebr.ufl.edu/sites/default/files/Research%20Reports/fpli_sp_2010.pdf

Subject Index:
Cost of living, Economy, Education, Florida Price Level Index (FPLI), Prices, Publications, County data, Florida data

Florida Price Level Index 2011

Publication Type: Regional Modeling, Cost of Living, Housing, Industrial and Occupational Structure, Labor Force and Labor Markets, Wages and Compensation
Pages: 4
Authors: Dewey, James F; Denslow, David, Irwin, Eve
Division: Economic Analysis
The Florida Price Level Index (FPLI), established by the Legislature as the basis for the District Cost Differential (DCD) in the Florida Education Finance Program, is used to represent the costs of hiring equally qualified personnel across school districts.
This brief includes a county FPLI comparison table of past years and a review of the FPLI methodology.

PDF: https://www.bebr.ufl.edu/sites/default/files/Research%20Reports/fpli_sp_2011.pdf

Subject Index:
Cost of living, Economy, Education, Florida Price Level Index (FPLI), Prices, Publications, County data, Florida data

Florida Price Level Index 2012

Publication Type: Regional Modeling, Cost of Living, Housing, Industrial and Occupational Structure, Labor Force and Labor Markets, Wages and Compensation
Pages: 4
Authors: Dewey, James F; Denslow, David, Irwin, Eve
Division: Economic Analysis
The Florida Price Level Index (FPLI), established by the Legislature as the basis for the District Cost Differential (DCD) in the Florida Education Finance Program, is used to represent the costs of hiring equally qualified personnel across school districts.

PDF: https://www.bebr.ufl.edu/sites/default/files/Research%20Reports/fpli_sp_2012_2-6-2012.pdf

Subject Index:
Other Research, Cost of living, Economy, Education, Florida Price Level Index (FPLI), Prices, Publications, County data, Florida data

Florida Price Level Index 2013

Publication Type: Regional Modeling, Cost of Living, Housing, Industrial and Occupational Structure, Labor Force and Labor Markets, Wages and Compensation
Pages: 3
Authors: Dewey, James F.
Division: Economic Analysis
The Florida Price Level Index (FPLI), established by the Legislature as the basis for the District Cost Differential (DCD) in the Florida Education Finance Program, is used to represent the costs of hiring equally qualified personnel across school districts.

PDF: https://www.bebr.ufl.edu/sites/default/files/Research%20Reports/fpli_sp_2013_2-7-2014_0.pdf

Subject Index:
Other Research, Cost of living, Economy, Education, Florida Price Level Index (FPLI), Prices, Publications, County data, Florida data

Florida Price Level Index 2014

Publication Type: Regional Modeling, Cost of Living, Housing, Industrial and Occupational Structure, Labor Force and Labor Markets, Wages and Compensation
Pages: 2
Authors: Dewey, James F.
Division: Economic Analysis
The Florida Price Level Index (FPLI) was established by the Legislature as the basis for the District Cost Differential in the Florida Education Finance Program. It represents the cost of hiring comparable personnel across school districts.
The FPLI 2014 is a joint project between the Florida Polytechnic University and the Bureau of Economic and Business Research.

PDF: https://floridapolytechnic.org/wp-content/uploads/2014fpli.pdf

Subject Index:
Research Report, Cost of living, Economy, Education, Florida Price Level Index (FPLI), Prices, Publications, County data, Florida data

Florida Price Level Index 2015

Publication Type: Regional Modeling, Cost of Living, Housing, Industrial and Occupational Structure, Labor Force and Labor Markets, Wages and Compensation
Pages: 2
Authors: Dewey, James F.
Division: Economic Analysis
The Florida Price Level Index (FPLI) was established by the Legislature as the basis for the District Cost Differential in the Florida Education Finance Program. It represents the cost of hiring comparable personnel across school districts.
The FPLI 2015 is a joint project between the Florida Polytechnic University and the Bureau of Economic and Business Research.

PDF: https://floridapolytechnic.org/wp-content/uploads/2015fpli.pdf

Subject Index:
Research Report, Cost of living, Economy, Education, Florida Price Level Index (FPLI), Prices, Publications, County data, Florida data

Florida Price Level Index 2016

Publication Date: Monday, January 23, 2017

The Florida Price Level Index (FPLI) was established by the Legislature as the basis for the District Cost Differential in the Florida Education Finance Program. It represents the cost of hiring comparable personnel across school districts.
The FPLI 2016 is a joint project between the Florida Polytechnic University and the Bureau of Economic and Business Research.
This brief is available here

https://floridapolytechnic.org/wp-content/uploads/2016fpli.pdf

Pages: 2
Author(s): Dewey, James F.

Florida Price Level Index 2016

Publication Type: Regional Modeling, Cost of Living, Housing, Industrial and Occupational Structure, Labor, Force, and, Labor Markets
Wages and Compensation
Pages: 2
Authors: Dewey, James F.
Division: Economic Analysis
The Florida Price Level Index (FPLI) was established by the Legislature as the basis for the District Cost Differential in the Florida The FPLI 2016 is a joint project between the Florida Polytechnic University and the Bureau of Economic and Business Research. Education Finance Program. It represents the cost of hiring comparable personnel across school districts.

PDF: https://floridapolytechnic.org/wp-content/uploads/2016fpli.pdf

Subject Index:
Research Report, Cost of living, Economy, Education, Florida Price Level Index (FPLI), Prices, Publications, County data, Florida data

Florida Price Level Index 2017

Publication Date:

Wednesday, January 10, 2018

The Florida Price Level Index (FPLI) was established by the Legislature as the basis for the District Cost Differential in the Florida Education Finance Program. It represents the cost of hiring comparable personnel across school districts.
The FPLI 2017 is a joint project between the Florida Polytechnic University and the Bureau of Economic and Business Research.
This brief is available here https://floridapolytechnic.org/wp-content/uploads/2017fpli.pdf

Pages:

2

Author(s):

Dewey, James F.

Analysis Type and Topic:

Regional Modeling
Cost of Living
Housing
Industrial and Occupational Structure
Labor Force and Labor Markets
Wages and Compensation

Publication Types:

Research Report

Cost of living
Economy
Education
Florida Price Level Index (FPLI)

County data
Florida data

BEBR Division:

Economic Analysis

Florida Price Level Index 2018

Publication Date:

Monday, February 11, 2019

The Florida Price Level Index (FPLI) was established by the Legislature as the basis for the District Cost Differential in the Florida Education Finance Program. It represents the cost of hiring comparable personnel across school districts.
The FPLI 2019 is a joint project between the Florida Polytechnic University and the Bureau of Economic and Business Research.
This brief is available here https://floridapolytechnic.org/wp-content/uploads/2019fpli.pdf

Pages:

2

Author(s):

Dewey, James F.

Analysis Type and Topic:

Regional Modeling
Cost of Living
Housing
Industrial and Occupational Structure
Labor Force and Labor Markets
Wages and Compensation

Publication Types:

Research Report

Cost of living
Economy
Education
Florida Price Level Index (FPLI)
Prices
Publications

Florida data

BEBR Division:

Economic Analysis

Florida’s Non-Emergency Medicaid Transportation Waiver

Publication Type: Cost Effectiveness, Public Policy, Transportation
Pages: 66
Authors: Dewey, James F.; Dai, Chifeng
Division: Economic Analysis
Pursuant to federal regulations governing the renewal of freedom-of-choice waivers, Florida’s Agency for Health Care Administration (AHCA) contracted with the Bureau of Economic and Business Research (BEBR) at the University of Florida in order to conduct this independent assessment of Florida’s Non-Emergency Transportation (NET) Waiver. Under this waiver, eligible Floridian Medicaid beneficiaries receive non-emergency transportation from their local Community Transportation Coordinators (CTC) in the Transportation
Disadvantaged (TD) Program.
This assessment’s objective is to examine whether AHCA’s participation in the TD program is cost-effective, and whether the quality of service provided under this waiver program is at least as good as under complete freedom of choice

PDF: https://www.bebr.ufl.edu/sites/default/files/Research%20Reports/medicaid_waiver1.pdf

Subject Index:
Health, Medicaid, Non-Emergency Transportation (NET) Waiver, Transportation, Florida data

Increasing Florida’s Sales Tax Revenue From Internet Purchases

Publication Type: Fiscal Impact, Public Policy, Revenue Forecasting, Taxation
Pages: 7
Authors: Holt, Lynne; Lotfinia, Babak
Division: Not Available
Florida, as one of only seven states to levy no tax on personal income, relies significantly more on the sales tax to fund its services than do states with a personal income tax. Since all consumers purchasing goods or services online are legally required to pay either sales or use tax, online transactions may represent a considerable source of revenue. To capture some of this revenue, Florida may wish to revise its tax laws, either by joining the Streamlined Sales Tax Project (SSTP) or by making smaller, technical modifications. This article explores issues surrounding each option.

PDF: https://www.bebr.ufl.edu/sites/default/files/Research%20Reports/floridafocus5_1_2009.pdf

Subject Index:
Economic Analysis Program, Internet, Retail sales, Taxable sales, Taxes

Innovation And Stem Education

Publication Type: Not Available
Pages: 1
Authors: Holt, Lynn; Leverty, Lynn
Division: Not Available
If we have learned anything during the past twenty years, it is that tomorrow’s occupation may not be today’s. Who would have thought that automation would render switchboard operators, assembly workers, and aircraft and automobile production welders obsolete? Twenty years ago, we would not have predicted demand for online community managers, tele-work coordinators, search engine optimization specialists, and sustainability managers. Rapidly changing technologies and global competition make it very difficult to predict occupations and occupational needs. As an example, biotechnology and information technology are changing so rapidly that one’s technical knowledge in those fields may become outdated very quickly. And then there are global developments which impinge on job demands and growth. The U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) projects, for example, no growth in demand for engineers in electronics because of foreign competition. BLS also projects a declining demand for chemical engineers because overall U.S. employment in chemical manufacturing is projected to be lower. Yet, even in sectors that are expected to experience declining demand, the numbers can be somewhat misleading. While it is true that chemical manufacturing jobs may be scarcer in the U.S., demand for chemical engineers employed in nanotechnology and biotechnology is projected to increase significantly.

PDF: https://www.bebr.ufl.edu/economics/website-article/innovation-and-stem-education

Subject Index:
Not Available

Inter-City Compensating Wage Differentials And Intra-City Workplace Centralization

Publication Type: Regional Modeling, Cost of Living, Housing, Industrial and Occupational Structure, Labor Force and Labor Markets, Wages and Compensation
Pages: 31
Authors: Dewey, Jim; Rojas, Gabriel M.
Division: Economic Analysis
Researchers explore the interaction of inter-city and intra-city compensating wage differentials by occupation conjecting that more central occupations receive higher wage premiums in larger cities, since workers in those occupations face a less desirable locus of housing prices and commuting times than those who have jobs in residential areas.

PDF: https://www.bebr.ufl.edu/sites/default/files/Research%20Reports/inter-city_compensating_wage.pdf

Subject Index:
Not Available

Intermodalism, Panama Canal Expansion, And Florida’s Ports

Publication Type: Not Available
Pages: 1
Authors: Irwin, Eve; Denslow, David
Division: Economic Analysis
In 1955, North Carolina trucking entrepreneur Malcom P. McLean bought a steamship company with the idea of transporting truck trailers with the cargo still inside. He realized that efficiency could be vastly improved if cargo could be placed in one container that was lifted from a vehicle directly onto a ship without first having to unload it. His ideas created the system of “intermodalism,” in which the same container, with the same cargo, with minimum interruption, could be moved seamlessly between ships, trucks, and trains during its journey. This greatly simplified logistical process eventually led to a revolution in cargo transportation and international trade. In 1961, the International Organization for Standardization (ISO) set standard container sizes. The 20-foot container, referred as a Twenty-foot Equivalent Unit (TEU), is the industry standard reference, and cargo volume and vessel capacity are now commonly measured in TEUs. The 40-foot container—2 TEUs—known as the Forty-foot Equivalent Unit (FEU) is the most frequently used container. By the 1980s, the introduction of double-stack trains further streamlined the intermodal system. Today more than 70% of general cargo moves in containers.

PDF: https://www.bebr.ufl.edu/economics/website-article/intermodalism-panama-canal-expansion-and-florida%E2%80%99s-ports

Subject Index:
Not Available

Jacksonville: Choosing A Future

Publication Type: Regional Modeling, Development, Public Policy
Pages: 15
Authors: Holt, Lynne
Division: Not Available
In September 2010, public television broadcast a program titled “Florida: Choosing the Future.” This program was produced with support from the Fred Friendly Seminars, the Florida Humanities Council, WEDU-Tampa, and the Reubin O’D. Askew Institute on Politics and Society at the University of Florida. Its purpose was to promote a broad-based discussion among Florida’s community leaders on the nature of Florida’s public policies as related to government, business development, education, the environment, and citizen participation. The program’s underlying premise was that Floridians need to be engaged in choosing a future for the state. In much the same vein, Jacksonville’s residents should position themselves to choose a future for Jacksonville/Duval County.

Jacksonville: Choosing a Future

Dr. Lynne Holt

Overview: In September 2010, public television broadcast a program titled “Florida: Choosing the Future.”The program’s underlying premise was that Floridians need to be engaged in choosing a future for the state. In much the same vein, Jacksonville’s residents should position themselves to choose a future for Jacksonville/Duval County. [Duval County and the State of Florida face many challenges as they emerge from the Great Recession. As a first step in this planning process, Duval County residents will need to ask the hard questions before they tackle the various economic and social challenges: What steps can be taken to place the County on a firmer economic and business footing? Should poverty reduction be a goal or is that more a byproduct of strategies to improve education and to reinvigorate the economy? Will Jacksonville’s post-recession policy choices move its residents closer to bringing everyone on board? This paper seeks to outline the challenges facing the County and address these questions.
Challenges for Economic Recovery: Very few states escaped the adverse impacts of the Great Recession, and Florida declined economically more than most. In particular, Florida’s foreclosure problem has contributed significantly to the state’s anemic recovery. Foreclosed housing in Florida as a percentage of total housing inventory exceeds the percentage of every other state. Although Florida does not lead the nation in mortgage payment delinquencies, the combination of delinquencies and foreclosed housing were the highest in the nation as of November 2010.
Foreclosure rates in Duval County, though significant, were only 59% of the state average. Duval County was spared some of the worst effects of the housing meltdown because the escalation of housing prices leading to the recession was not as great as in other Florida metro regions. New housing construction is also significantly down from the 2005 peak. Duval County was slower than the state as a whole to experience negative growth in housing starts as measured by housing units that were permitted. A sluggish demand for new housing also resulted from a significant slowing in the state’s population growth. Population growth in 2008-2009 and 2009-2010 was the lowest since the 1940s. For 2009, the population was estimated to have grown by only 0.1% in Florida, much the same as in Duval County.
Sluggish net migration is responsible for the much lower estimated population growth during 2010 and 2011. During several months in 2008 and 2009, Florida actually experienced negative net migration. Population growth is shaped by many forces beyond a county’s or even the state’s control, such as business’ access to national and international credit markets which can drive hiring and expansion. Baby boomers may decide not to move to Florida for retirement if they cannot sell their homes elsewhere and shrinking retirement portfolios may dampen relocation plans. However, local governments, such as Duval County, often can and do deploy various economic development strategies that may affect decisions on the part of businesses to relocate, remain, expand their operations, or leave a community or state. These strategies may also affect decisions of families and retirees to move to and remain in Florida and of tourists to visit Florida.
Deploying Development Strategies – A Balancing Act:
Duval County’s leaders are faced with a balancing act in implementing economic development strategies, because resources are finite and stakeholder interests obviously differ. Businesses considering expansion will be interested in different public services than, for example, families who are weighing the pros and cons of moving to Jacksonville or tourists who are considering a holiday on one of Jacksonville’s beaches.
All these parties, despite disparate interests, share the need for goods and services. For businesses, the need may include workforce training facilities and a skilled labor pool; for families, decent, affordable and safe housing, and good and dependable wages,

Jacksonville: Choosing A Future — Detailed Version

Publication Type: Regional Modeling, Development, Public Policy
Pages: 18
Authors: Holt, Lynne
Division: Not Available
In September 2010, public television broadcast a program titled “Florida: Choosing the Future.” This program was produced with support from the Fred Friendly Seminars, the Florida Humanities Council, WEDU-Tampa, and the Reubin O’D. Askew Institute on Politics and Society at the University of Florida. Its purpose was to promote a broad-based discussion among Florida’s community leaders on the nature of Florida’s public policies as related to government, business development, education, the environment, and citizen participation. The program’s underlying premise was that Floridians need to be engaged in choosing a future for the state. In much the same vein, Jacksonville’s residents should position themselves to choose a future for Jacksonville/Duval County.

PDF: https://www.bebr.ufl.edu/sites/default/files/Research%20Reports/jacksonville_choosing_a_future.pdf

Subject Index:
Economy, City data, Florida data

Low, Declining, Polarizing – 2012 Florida Regional Economic Symposium

Publication Type: Not Available
Pages: 22
Authors: Dewey, James F; Denslow, David
Division: Economic Analysis
After removing the effects of local amenities, prices, and local labor supply and demand shocks, on a wage based measure of skill Florida’s average job just before the Great Recession was 3% below the nation’s, down from 2% at the beginning of the last decade. Florida mimics the national pattern of wage and job polarization—the hollowing of the middle of the skill distribution coupled with strongly rising relative pay for high-skill jobs, slightly rising relative pay for low-skill jobs, and falling relative pay for mid-skill jobs. In addition, labor force participation fell more in Florida than in the U.S. over the past 30 years, and this was more pronounced at low education levels. Simultaneously, real earnings for those with low education levels fell, but less than in the rest of the nation. Florida is in the midst of a pronounced emptying of the middle of its job skill distribution in which increasing demand for workers in low-skill manual non-routine jobs is apparently outpacing increasing demand for high-skill analytical workers.The agglomeration economies exhibited by high-skill jobs and expected baby boom retirements are likely to accelerate this process absent aggressive and urgent public investment in education and infrastructure, which seems unlikely.

PDF: https://www.bebr.ufl.edu/sites/default/files/Research%20Reports/low_declining_polarizing_-_2012_florida_regional_economic_symposium.pdf

Subject Index:
Not Available

Occupation Centrality

Publication Type: Regional Modeling, Cost of Living, Housing, Industrial and Occupational Structure, Labor Force and Labor Markets
Pages: 1
Authors: Dewey, Jim; Rojas, Gabriel M.
Division: Economic Analysis
Documentation for Occupational Centrality Paper

PDF: https://www.bebr.ufl.edu/sites/default/files/Research%20Reports/explanation_-_documentation_of_data_and_results_in_inter-city_wage_differentials_and_intra-city_workplace_centralization.pdf

Subject Index:
Economic Analysis Program

Plum Creek, UF, And Economic Growth In The Gainesville Region

Publication Type: Economic Impact, Regional Modeling, Development
Pages: 46
Authors: Dewey, Jim; Denslow, David; Schaub, Ray
Division: Economic Analysis
Plum Creek, UF, and Economic Growth in the Gainesville Region

PDF: https://www.bebr.ufl.edu/sites/default/files/Research%20Reports/5h-i_plum_creek_uf_and_economic_growth_in_the_gainesville_region.pdf

Subject Index:
Research Report, Business, Commercial properties, Community development, Comprehensive planning, Economy, Employment, Regional Modeling, University of Florida, City data, County data

Polk County Healthcare Study: An Economic Analysis Of Polk County’s Indigent Health Care Tax And Safety Net Program

Publication Type: Economic Impact
Pages: 35
Authors: Sandoval, Hector H.; Rowe, Steven; Walsh, Anita; Porter, Colleen K.
Division: Economic Analysis
Polk County, Florida’s Indigent Health Care program guarantees the provision of quality health care to the indigent and medically poor residents of the county. For the past 11 years, a one-half cent sales surtax approved by voters in Polk County in 2004 has provided funding for medical and dental services to hundreds of thousands of Polk’s most vulnerable people.

The University of Florida’s Bureau of Economic and Business Research (BEBR) conducted a study to determine the economic impact associated with the Indigent Health Care program. Qualitative research included semi-structured interviews with key stakeholders, including physicians and administrators of hospitals and clinics.

PDF: https://www.bebr.ufl.edu/sites/default/files/Research%20Reports/polk_report_6-8-16.pdf

Subject Index:
Research Report, Health, County data

Quantifying The Economic Impact Of The Florida Museum Of Natural History On Alachua County And Florida

Publication Type: Economic Impact
Pages: 7
Authors: Denslow, David; Schaub, Ray
Division: Economic Analysis
The Florida Museum of Natural History (FLMNH) contributes in many ways to the economy of Alachua County and, more broadly, the state of Florida, through its activities. Some of these contributions are quite tangible while others are more intangible. While the intangible may be significant, this study uses FLMNH-provided data and RIMS II multipliers to quantify the tangible contributions to these two regions. The economic impact of the FLMNH is reported in terms of five different metrics: gross output, earnings, employment, value added, and tax revenues.

PDF: https://www.bebr.ufl.edu/sites/default/files/Research%20Reports/flmnh_economic_impact_results_7-20-15.pdf

Subject Index:
Research Reports, Earnings, Economic Analysis Program, Economy, Education, Employment, Jobs, Taxes, Tourism, University of Florida, County data, Florida data

Reports On Trends And Conditions Research: The Impact Of The Internet On Transportation In Florida

Publication Type: Economic Impact, Development, Industrial and Occupational Structure, Public Policy, Transportation
Pages: 18
Authors: Dewey, James F.; Denslow, Denslow; Herndon, Jill Boylston; Irwin, Eve
Division: Economic Analysis
The purpose of this paper is to survey current literature on the economic impact of the Internet on transportation. To that end we have searched literature across disciplines including sociology, geography, business, and economics that offers potential answers to the following questions: How are companies incorporating Internet technology into their products and business models? How will the Internet change commuter and shipping traffic? By how much? What models are available to predict the impact of the Internet on future transportation patterns? How does the Internet compare to previous innovations? How will national technological, transportation, and commuting trends affect Florida’s economy and infrastructure?

PDF: https://www.bebr.ufl.edu/sites/default/files/Research%20Reports/internetstudy_0.pdf

Subject Index:
Economy, Internet, Policy Studies, Public policy, Transportation

Research On The Florida Education Finance Program-The FPLI, The Sparsity Supplement, And Discretionary Millage

Publication Type: Regional Modeling, Cost of Living, Education, Labor Force and Labor Markets, Public Policy, Wages and Compensation
Pages: 134
Authors: Dewey, James F.; Denslow, David; Lotfinia, Babak
Division: Economic Analysis
In this report, we consider the accuracy and appropriateness of several aspects of the Florida Education Finance Program (FEFP) – the Florida Price Level Index (FPLI), the Sparsity Adjustment, and Discretionary Millage.

PDF: https://www.bebr.ufl.edu/sites/default/files/Research%20Reports/fefp_report_0.pdf

Subject Index:
Economy, Education, Florida Education Finance Program, Property taxes, Taxes

Soaring House Prices And Wages Of Local Government Employees

Publication Type: Fiscal Impact, Regional Modeling, Cost of Living, Housing, Labor Force and Labor Markets, Public Policy, Taxation, Wages and Compensation
Pages: 14
Authors: Durrenberger, Tom; Dewey, James F.; Denslow, David
Division: Economic Analysis
Local governments in Florida are concerned that the same soaring house prices that have boosted their revenue base have also increased the wages they have to pay to attract a qualified work force, especially relative to similar local governments in many other states where the housing boom has been less remarkable. The doubling of Florida house prices over the past six years that increased local property tax revenue raises concerns that a shortage of affordable housing will undermine their efforts to recruit and retain employees. In this article, we note that the relevant determinant of how wages will change in the long run is the implicit rent of owner‐occupied housing—which is theoretically equivalent to user cost of housing—and the actual rent of apartments and rented houses in an area.

PDF: https://www.bebr.ufl.edu/sites/default/files/Research%20Reports/floridafocus3_3_2007_0.pdf

Subject Index:
Housing, Prices, Property taxes, Real estate, Taxes

The Florida Housing Boom

Publication Type: Cost of Living, Development, Housing, Labor Force and Labor Markets, Public Policy
Pages: 16
Authors: Montes Rojas, Gabriel; McGuire, Sandra T.; Ivey, Susan; Durrenberger, Tom
Division: Not Available
The recent rise and subsequent decline of housing prices, both in Florida and across the nation, have led to speculation about the nature of house prices in general. This paper explores recent trends in house prices, especially in Florida.

PDF: https://www.bebr.ufl.edu/sites/default/files/Research%20Reports/floridafocus3_2_2007_0.pdf

Subject Index:
Prices, Real State

Scroll to Top